You want to be an author? You are not alone.

Statistics imply that more than 80 percent of Americans would like to be an author. Maybe 1 in 100 actually write a book. Maybe 1 in 100 of those who write a book are able to attain an agent. Fewer than 1 in 100 of those who write a book are able to secure a traditional publishing contract. Much less than 1 in 100 hit a bestseller list.

Does this make becoming an author about as likely as winning the lottery?

But that isn’t a fair comparison, because the lottery is pure chance, while becoming an author is simply about hard work. Authoring a book is well within your reach. All it takes is hard work and persistence. Talent and luck don’t hurt.

We at Dancing Moon Press encourage you to pitch your book in the traditional marketplace. We can even coach you in that process, from querying to pitching to book proposal writing.

But if you’d like to retain more control over your creative process, consider publishing with Dancing Moon Press. When you’re ready, we are here to help you make your publishing dreams a reality.

Dancing Moon Press is a fully independent press. We provide a full range of book production services to authors. We help authors who are ready to see their book in print but are reluctant to take on all of the tasks of self-publishing on their own. At our hybrid press, your book will be guided through the entire production process with the benefit of our expert guidance and with Dancing Moon Press as your imprint.

There was a time when self-publishing was uncommon. Those times have changed. Independent publishing of all kinds has boomed in the last two decades. Self-published books now dwarf traditional published books 2:1.

Most successful authors have some combination of talent, persistence and luck. Does this sound like you?

“Authoring a book doesn’t have to be about bestseller lists and top sales numbers. Some of my most rewarding moments as an author have been small town book events with ten people in attendance, but which elicited intimate conversation and resulted in lasting friendships. For me, being a writer is about connecting in a really genuine, honest way with readers, no matter how many.” – Kim Cooper Findling

Oregon Literary Coalition.

Post an announcement whenever you have a book reading or other event scheduled. Notice goes out to an enormous number of subscribers throughout the state. If you are not already a member of the Literary Coalition, you will need to subscribe — membership is free. To subscribe: http://lists.oregonstate.edu/mailman/listinfo/olc.

Oregon Authors

The statewide network for Oregon authors: Promote books, connect with local reader and writer groups, identify local publishers and libraries, keep informed of statewide literary opportunities and events. Contact: Katie Anderson, Oregon State Library, 250 Winter St. NE, Salem, OR 97301; katie.anderson@state.or.us, 503-378-2528. Oregon authors may apply for a username and password to create/update their own page: http://www.oregonauthors.org/contact/index.php?cType=author.

Oregon Coast Council for the Arts

The Oregon Coast Council for the Arts is the hub of an immense range of artistic experiences (writing, theater, movies, music, dance) as well as access to world-renowned artists. Its mission is also to nurture the artist in everyone by providing a range of educational opportunities for professional and amateur artists. The OCCA serves as regional arts council for coastal Clatsop, Tillamook, Lincoln, Coos and Curry counties, as well as the coastal towns of Lane and Douglas counties. It manages the Newport Performing Arts Center and the Newport Visual Arts Center. Additional information, including a schedule of events throughout the region, can be found at: http://www.coastarts.org.

Oregonian Book Reviews and literary events calendar

This calendar is focused in Sunday’s “O!” section. The “Readings” page of Friday’s Arts & Entertainment section features a column on an upcoming reading or event. Also check out “Baker’s Hot Sheet” of recommended readings and events. The “Bookmarks” column, in Monday’s “How We Live” section, includes highlights of the Bookmark’s blog that runs daily on OregonLive.com. http://www.oregonlive.com/books. Other book coverage is found in the “How We Live” section throughout the week. Send press releases. Notices must be received at least 14 days before publication. Send to Literary Calendar, The Oregonian, 1320 S.W. Broadway or books@oregonian.com.

Oregonian Poetry Column

Address work to: poetry@oregonian.com or mail to: Poetry, The Oregonian, 1320 SW Broadway, Portland, OR 97201. Include SASE if you want a response

Digital archive of poetry readings Contact: Melissa Dalton, Poetry Fellow, Lewis & Clark College, mdalton@lclark.edu.

Soapstone

Soapstone is a clearinghouse for announcements regarding book readings and appearances. retreats@soapstone.org. No charge for listing events that are free and open to the public.

Goodreads Authors Program

A completely free feature designed to help authors reach their target audience ­ passionate readers. A place for new and established authors to promote their books. www.goodreads.com/author/program

American Library Association Booklist Online

An interesting site: ala.org